Whanganui DistrictCommunity profile
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Wanganui District

Specific topic notes

Population

The data on this page are sourced from a variety of different tables and designed to give a range of population and dwelling numbers for the area.

All data excludes Overseas Visitors except for the “Overseas visitors” category.

Please note that “Population” referred to on this page relates entirely to Census population (either Enumerated or Usual Residence). For the current official population estimates (ERP) please refer to the “Population estimates” page.

‘Overseas Visitors’ includes all people whose usual residence is outside New Zealand, and who plan to be in New Zealand for less than 12 months. They are normally excluded from all tables within profile.id but are included separately here for reference. This item relates only to enumerated population, as by definition there are no usual residents who are overseas visitors.

‘Total dwellings’ includes both private and non-private dwellings. All dwellings data are based on place of enumeration.

‘Māori descent’ includes all persons who answered question 14 on the Census form “Are you descended from a Māori (that is, did you have a Māori birth parent, grandparent or great-grandparent, etc)?” with “Yes”. It is not derived from the “Māori” response to the Ethnicity question, and this population can have any birthplace.

Service age groups

Derived from the Census question:

'When were you born?'

Groups the population by age into categories which reflect a similar life stage or service user profiles.

Includes all persons except 'Overseas Visitors'.

  • 0-4 Babies and pre-schoolers
  • 5-11 Primary Schoolers
  • 12-17 Secondary Schoolers
  • 18-24 Tertiary education and transition to independence
  • 25-34 Young workforce
  • 35-49 Parents and homebuilders
  • 50-59 Older workforce and emerging empty nesters
  • 60-69 Empty nesters and retirees
  • 70-84 Seniors
  • 85+ Frail aged

If an answer to the Age question is not provided, the Statistics New Zealand imputes the age of the respondent, so there is no "Not stated" category for this variable.

For more information on the data quality of Age, please refer to the Age data quality statement on the Statistics NZ website

Five year age groups

Derived from the Census question:

'When were you born?'

Five year age groups provide equal age cohorts enabling direct comparison between all ages without distortion.

Includes all persons except 'Overseas Visitors'.

If an answer to the Age question is not provided, the Statistics New Zealand imputes the age of the respondent, so there is no "Not stated" category for this variable.

For more information on the data quality of Age, please refer to the Age data quality statement on the Statistics NZ website .

Single year of age

Derived from the Census question:

'When were you born?'

Presents single year of age data in an age-sex pyramid

This dataset is only presented for the 2013 Census.

Includes all persons except 'Overseas Visitors'.

Enables the identification of small groups and small changes in age structure over time as well as comparison by gender. Males appear on the left of the chart, and females presented to the same scale appear on the right of the chart.

If an answer to the Age question is not provided, the Statistics New Zealand imputes the age of the respondent, so there is no "Not stated" category for this variable.

For more information on the data quality of Age, please refer to the Age data quality statement on the Statistics NZ website .

Ethnic groups

Derived from the Census question:

'Which ethnic group do you belong to?'.

Multi-response

This question asks the respondent to classify their ethnic group. It is subjective, and somewhat open to interpretation, particularly each person's understanding of the term "ethnicity". The 2013 Census asked people to consider an ethnic group as having:

  • a common proper name
  • one or more elements of common culture that need not be specified, but may include religion, customs, or language
  • a unique community of interests, feelings, and actions
  • a shared sense of common origins or ancestry
  • a common geographic origin.

A total of 238 individual ethnicity responses are captured by the Census, but only the largest groups are shown in this topic in profile.id (Level 1).

'Not stated/included' includes the response 'Don’t know' as well as the non-responses 'Not Stated' and 'Unidentifiable'.

Note that ethnicity is a multiple response topic, so the total of all categories will be greater than the total population. The second table shows the total number of responses compared to the total population.

Please note that due to a change in the definition of “New Zealander European” in the ethnicity classification between 2001 and 2006, no pre-2006 data are included in this question. While “New Zealander” is not officially part of the level 1 classification (included under “Other Ethnicity”, it is a very large group and so is included separately in profile.id.

Māori descent

Derived from the Census question:

'Are you descended from a Māori (that is, did you have a Māori birth parent, grandparent or great-grandparent etc)?'

This dataset is sourced from the Census question 'Are you descended from a Māori (that is, did you have a Māori birth parent, grandparent or great-grandparent etc)?'

The wording of the Census question is taken to imply that there is no limit to how many generations a person may look back to identify Māori ancestry.

A person has Māori descent if they are of the Māori race of New Zealand; this includes any descendant of such a person. The term 'Māori descent' is based on a genealogical or biological concept, rather than on cultural affiliation to the Māori ethnic group. Information on cultural affiliations, or ethnicity, is collected in the census question on ethnic group. It is important to view this question in conjunction with the question about Ethnicity as some people who have Māori ancestry may not identify themselves ethnically as Maori. There is no reason to expect the populations stating Māori ethnicity to equate to those stating Māori descent in this question.

Māori in this context are inclusive of New Zealand Maori, but Cook Island Māori people are not included.

'Not stated/included' primarily includes people who did not answer this Census question, or provided an answer which was unintelligible.

Country of birth

Derived from the Census question:

'Which country were you born in?'.

Country of birth refers to the country where the person was born, and uses the name of the country at the time of the Census. Country is the current, short or official name of a country, dependency, or other area of geopolitical interest.

The term "country" is defined to include:

  • Independent nations recognised by the New Zealand Government.
  • Units which are recognised geographic areas;
  • Administrative subdivisions of the United Kingdom, and;
  • Overseas dependencies, external territories of independent countries

The 'United Kingdom' includes England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Channel Islands, Isle of Man, and 'United Kingdom not further defined'.

'Total Overseas born' includes 'inadequately described' and 'at sea'.

'China (people's republic of) ' excludes the Special Administrative Regions of Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan.

Please note that a few countries have been combined for comparison with earlier Census years (2001 and 2006). An example is Sudan/South Sudan – which were a single country in the 2006 and 2001 Censuses.

Birthplace is coded using the Standard Country or Area Codes for Statistical Use.

For more information see Country of Birth on the Stats NZ website.

Languages spoken

Derived from the Census question:

'In which language(s) could you have a conversation about a lot of everyday things?'.

Multi-response

Language is a multi-response question which records all languages which a person can speak and understand (including sign language). It does not include reading and writing a particular language.

Only English, Maori, Samoan and New Zealand Sign Language have boxes to mark on the Census form. All other languages require the respondent to mark “Other” and write in the language spoken.

A total of 194 different languages are recorded in the Census. The data presented in profile.id are the top 10 language responses for the selected area, with the option to show additional languages down to 0.1% of population for the area. English is not included in the chart as its inclusion would make other languages appear very small.

As language is a multiple response question, the total number of responses will sum to greater than the total population, and therefore the percentages shown on the table add to more than 100%. The totals shown in the table below indicate the difference between population and responses.

The summary table at the top of the page includes the official language indicator (English, Maori, Sign Language), and is not multi-response. The categories here are mutually exclusive and add to total population.

‘Northern Chinese’ includes all Mandarin speakers.

‘Yue’ is a group of Chinese languages which includes Cantonese.

'Semitic not further defined' includes speakers of Arabic, as well as Ethiopian, Berber and Oromo.

For more information on language please see the Languages spoken page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Religion

Derived from the Census question:

'What is your religion?'.

Multi-response

Religion is coded using the New Zealand standard religious classification.

Please note that religion is an optional question on the Census form and respondents have the right to object to answering. There is a specific box to mark for those who object. These respondents are included in the category “Not stated/included” along with those who did not mark the question at all.

Religion is a multiple-response question, with percentages potentially adding to more than 100% as they are calculated from the population. In 2013, only 2.4% of the population nominated more than one religion.

The summary table also counts responses, so if a respondent marked multiple Christian or Non-Christian religions they will be counted more than once in here. The effect is negligible due to the low multi-response rate.

The response 'No religion' is exclusive of any other response.

For more information on the data quality and use of the Religion question, please see the Religion page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Highest qualification achieved

Derived from the Census questions:

'What is your highest secondary school qualification?', 'Apart from secondary school qualifications do you have another completed qualification?', and 'Print your highest qualification level and the main subject.'

This topic presents data on the highest educational qualification an individual has achieved. It combines school, non-school and tertiary qualifications into a single classification.

A qualification is a formally recognised award for educational or training attainment, where formal recognition means that the qualification is approved by one of the following (or their predecessors):

  • New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA)
  • Universities New Zealand – Te Pōkai Tara
  • Association of Polytechnics of New Zealand
  • Association of Colleges of Education in New Zealand
  • approval bodies that have been recognised by NZQA
  • The recognised overseas authority of a secondary school, profession, academic discipline, or trade.

'Highest qualification' is derived for people aged 15 years and over, and combines highest secondary school qualification and post-school qualification to obtain a single highest qualification by category of attainment.

'Highest secondary school qualification' is the highest secondary school qualification gained by category of attainment, and is collected for people aged 15 years and over.

'Post-school qualification' is the highest qualification a person aged 15 years and over has gained over and above any school qualifications. Included are qualifications awarded by educational and training institutions, as well as those gained from on-the-job training. Post-school qualification data is produced as category of attainment and by field of study.

Qualifications data are applicable to people over the age of 15 only

'Higher Degree' includes 'Masters Degree', 'Doctorate Degree' and 'Post-Graduate and Honours Degree'.

Post-school (excluding university) includes all technical and certificate level qualifications.

This variable has a relatively high non-response rate in 2013, of 13.1% across New Zealand, so please use with caution.

Due to changes in the classification between 2001 and 2006, only 2013 and 2006 data are presented for this topic.

For more information on this topic please see the Qualification page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Field of qualification

Derived from the Census question:

'Print your highest qualification level and the main subject.'

Presents data on the main broad field of study of the highest educational qualification an individual has received.

Unlike level of qualification information, field of study relates only to post-school (tertiary) qualifications. Those without a tertiary qualification are included as "No Post-School Qualification".

Qualifications data are applicable to people over the age of 15 who are New Zealand residents.

For more information on this topic please see the Qualification page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Smoking behaviour

Derived from the Census questions:

'Do you smoke cigarettes regularly (that is, one or more a day)?', and 'Have you ever been a regular smoker of one or more cigarettes a day'

'Cigarette smoking behaviour' refers to the active smoking of one or more manufactured or hand-rolled tobacco cigarettes, from purchased or home-grown tobacco, per day, by people aged 15 years and over.

Cigarette smoking does not include:

  • The smoking of cigars, pipes and cigarillos;
  • The smoking of any other substances, herbal cigarettes or marijuana for example;
  • The consumption of tobacco products by other means, such as chewing

Information on cigarette smoking was collected in 2013 and 2006, but not in 2001, so only two Census years are available for this question.

For more information on this topic, please see the Cigarette Smoking Behaviour page on the Stats NZ Census website.

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Year of arrival in New Zealand

Derived from the Census question:

'When did you first arrive to live in New Zealand?'

Year of arrival is collected on the Census form, and aggregated into ranges for this topic.

It includes that population who were born overseas and were resident in New Zealand at Census time.

People who did not state their country of birth are excluded.

For more information see Years since arrival in New Zealand on the Stats NZ website.

Labour force status

Derived from the Census question:

'In the 7 days that ended on Sunday 3 March, which of these did you do?'.

A person is classified as employed for Census purposes if they were in the working-age population (people aged 15 years and over) and during the week ended 3 March 2013:

  • worked for one hour or more for pay or profit in the context of an employee/employer relationship or self-employment
  • worked without pay for one hour or more in work that contributed directly to the operation of a farm, business or professional practice owned or operated by a relative
  • had a job but were not at work due to:
    • their illness or injury
    • personal or family responsibilities
    • bad weather or mechanical breakdown
    • direct involvement in an industrial dispute
    • being on leave or holiday.

Includes persons aged 15 years and over.

'Employed full time' is defined as having worked 30 hours or more in all jobs during the week prior to Census night (the week ended Sunday March 3).

'Employed part time' is defined as having worked less than 30 hours in all jobs during the week prior to Census night (the week ended Sunday March 3).

Unemployed refers to all the people in the working age population who, during the week ended 3 March 2013, were without a paid job, but were available to start work and had actively sought work within the last 4 weeks.

The 'Labour force' is defined as all persons aged 15 years and over who are looking for work, or are employed, either full time, part time or casually.

'Not in the labour force' includes all people over 15 who are not employed and not looking for work.

Detailed information on data quality for this variable is available on the Stats New Zealand website .

Industry

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the main activity of (your) business or employer.'

This dataset describes the industries in which employed people work. It applies only to people aged 15 and over who were employed in the week ended Sunday 3 March 2013 or the equivalent week before the previous Census. The industry shown relates only to the main job held by the individual – ie. The job in which a person worked the most hours.

Data for industry are coded using the Australia and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC). The industry classification is updated periodically to take account of emerging industries and changes in the structure of the economy.

The ANZSIC classification was changed between the 2001 and 2006 Censuses, and is not comparable. For this reason, only 2006 and 2013 data are presented here.

Data are shown at the 1-digit ANZSIC level for which there are 19 industry divisions. Drill-downs are available on the page to the 2-digit level which includes 87 industry sub-divisions.

For more information, please refer to the ANZSIC 2006 classification and the Industry page on the Stats NZ website.

Occupations

Derived from the Census questions:

'In the job that you worked the most hours in, what was your occupation?' and 'In that job, what tasks or duties did you spend the most time on'

It includes only persons aged 15 years and over who were employed in the week prior to Census, and relates to the main job held (most hours in the week) only.

This topic includes the broadest 1-digit classification of occupations, which breaks down jobs into 8 broad groups.

Data for occupation are coded using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) . The occupation classification categorises occupations broadly based on skill level and educational qualifications required.

The occupation classification is updated periodically to take account of emerging occupation groups and changes to the structure of the labour force. The most recent change was in 2006, so 2001 data are not comparable and are not presented here.

Please note that it is not possible to derive an unemployment rate for a specific occupation (eg. how many unemployed truck drivers are there?). This is because occupation is only collected for those who are actually employed. An unemployed person by definition does not have an occupation.

For more information on this topic including a quality statement, please refer to the Occupation page on the Stats NZ Census site.

Main method of travel to work

Derived from the Census question:

'On Tuesday 5 March, what was the one main way you travelled to work – that is, the one you used for the greatest distance?'

This dataset looks at the method of travel to work of employed people. It applies only to people aged 15 and over who were employed in the week prior to Census.

Method of travel relates specifically to the journey to work on the morning of Census day (in 20013, this was March 5th). This differs to the industry and occupation data which relates to the main job held in the week prior to Census. Method of travel on one day does not necessarily indicate the usual means of travel, nor does it give any indication for those who didn’t go to work on that day.

The method of travel is a single response variable. If a person travelled using multiple methods, they are instructed to record only that method which they used for the longest distance.

For more information please refer to the Main means of travel to work page on the Stats NZ website.

Unpaid work

Derived from the Census question:

'In the last 4 weeks, which of these have you done without pay'

Multi-response

This is a multiple response question, as respondents are asked to nominate all types of unpaid work they performed in the four weeks prior to Census date. Percentages will add to more than 100% as the majority of people stated more than one answer.

The denominator can be chosen as total population (default) or total respondents (those who stated an answer to the question). Total population is recommended as the denominator.

The non-response rate to this variable is 10.5% for New Zealand, which is relatively high. Data should be used with caution.

For more information on the collection of this data and its use, please see the Unpaid activities page on the Stats NZ Census site.

Individual income

Derived from the Census question:

'From all sources of income identified, what will the total income be that you got yourself, before tax or anything was taken out of it, in the 12 months that will end on 31 March 2013?'

This dataset includes total gross personal income (from all sources, including pensions and allowances) before tax that a person received in the 12 months ended in March of the relevant Census year.

This question applies only to people aged 15 years and over.

Individual incomes are collected as ranges in the Census. For 2013, the $50,000-$70,000 band was split and a new range added $100-$150,000, with $150,001+ now being the top range. For comparison of incomes over time, please use Individual Income quartiles.

The non-response rate for this variable is 9.7% in 2013.

For more information on the data collection in this topic, please see the Total income page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Individual income quartiles

Derived from the Census question:

'From all sources of income identified, what will the total income be that you got yourself, before tax or anything was taken out of it, in the 12 months that will end on 31 March 2013?'

Individual income groups are not comparable over time because of the influences of economic change such as wage level fluctuations and inflation. The income quartile method has been adopted as the most objective method of comparing change in the income profile of a community over time.

Individual income quartiles look at the distribution of incomes in Wanganui District relative to New Zealand. Quartiles split the total population into four equal parts for the benchmark area. The table shows the number and proportion of individuals in Wanganui District falling into each segment for the benchmark area.

The table gives a clear picture of where individual incomes in Wanganui District sit relative to New Zealand. For New Zealand, 25% of persons fall into each category. If, for example, Wanganui District has 30% in the top category and only 20% in the lowest, this indicates that Wanganui District has proportionally more higher-income individuals and less lower-income individuals.

The quartiles are calculated from the ranges which existed at the time of the Census. 2013 Census has two new ranges for individual income, but the quartile method assumes uniform distribution within the ranges and estimates the 25% cut off points separately each Census.

Users can then compare directly the changes in the number and percentage of households in each income quartile to see whether incomes are increasing or decreasing over time relative to the national average.

Household income

Derived from the Census question:

'From all sources of income identified, what will the total income be that you got yourself, before tax or anything was taken out of it, in the 12 months that will end on 31 March 2013?'

Household income comprises the total of incomes of all persons in the household who stated an income and were at home on Census night.

As total personal income is collected in income ranges (eg $25,001–$30,000), and not as an actual dollar income (eg $29,500), in order for total housheold income to be calculated, a representative income is determined for each total personal income range. Household surveys have been used to calculate these representative incomes. Every person in that range is assigned the representative income, and these are then summed to produce household income.

Households where one or more personal incomes were not stated or a resident over 15 was away on Census night are included in 'Not Stated'. In these cases, the aggregate of all stated individual incomes would be less than the true household income so these households are excluded from the classification.

Because it only takes one not stated personal income in the household to put the entire household in the “Not Stated” category, the non-response rate for this variable is quite high, at 15.0% in 2013.

For more information on the data collection in this topic, please see the Total income page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Household income quartiles

Derived from the Census question:

'From all sources of income identified, what will the total income be that you got yourself, before tax or anything was taken out of it, in the 12 months that will end on 31 March 2013?'

Household income comprises the total of incomes of all persons in the household who stated an income and were at home on Census night.

Household income groups are not comparable over time because of the influences of economic change such as wage level fluctuations and inflation. The income quartile method has been adopted as the most objective method of comparing change in the income profile of a community over time.

Household income quartiles look at the distribution of incomes in Wanganui District relative to New Zealand. Quartiles split the total population into four equal parts for the benchmark area. The table shows the number and proportion of Households in Wanganui District falling into each segment for the benchmark area.

The table gives a clear picture of where household incomes in Wanganui District sit relative to New Zealand. For New Zealand, 25% of households fall into each category. If, for example, Wanganui District has 30% in the top category and only 20% in the lowest, this indicates that Wanganui District has proportionally more higher-income households and less lower-income households.

The quartiles are calculated from the ranges which existed at the time of the Census. 2013 Census has two new ranges for household income, but the quartile method assumes uniform distribution within the ranges and estimates the 25% cutoff points separately each Census.

Users can then compare directly the changes in the number and percentage of households in each income quartile to see whether incomes are increasing or decreasing over time relative to the national average.

Household income sources

Derived from the Census question:

'Show all the ways you yourself got income in the 12 months ending today (excluding loans because they are not income)?'

Multi-response

Sources of income includes all sources which individuals in the household have identified as having received income from in the 12 months ended March in the Census year.

Sources of income is a multiple response question, and as most households have income from more than one source, the sum of all responses is likely to be significantly in excess of the total population. Percentages are calculated from the total population, so percentages will add to well over 100% in most cases.

'Superannuation, Pensions, Annuities' includes the categories 'NZ Superannuation or Veterans Pension' and 'Other Super., Pensions, Annuities'.

'Government Benefits and Payments' includes 'Sickness Benefit', 'Domestic Purposes Benefit', 'Invalids Benefit' and 'Other Govt Benefits, Payments or Pension'.

Please note the differing time periods if comparing with employment data. Employment relates only to the week prior to Census, while the sources of income data relates to the entire previous 12 months.

For more information about this topic, please refer to the Sources of Income page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Family type

Derived from the Census questions:

'How is each person in the household related to you?'

The table counts family units in family households, and breaks them down by the presence of couples, single parents, and dependent and adult children. This classification of a family includes persons who are temporarily absent from the family on Census night (absentees).

A family nucleus comprises a couple with or without child(ren), or one parent and their child(ren) whose usual residence is in the same household; the children do not have partners or children of their own living in that household. Included are people who were absent on census night but usually live in a particular dwelling, and are members of a family nucleus in that dwelling, as long as they were reported as being absent by the reference person on the dwelling form.

'Couple with dependent children' and 'One parent family with dependent children' includes all families with children under the age of 18 years who were not employed full time.

'Couple with adult children only' and 'One parent family with adult children only' includes all families with no dependent children, but with children aged over 18 present, or children under 18 and in full time employment.

This dataset includes same sex couple families.

Households where all members were absent on Census night are excluded from the count because their dwellings are unoccupied.

For more information about this topic, please see the Family Type page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Households type

Derived from the Census questions:

'How is each person in the household related to you?'

The table counts households. Households can contain up to three families, or a sole person, group of unrelated individuals (flatmates etc.) or other household.

The 'Non-classifiable household' category includes all those households where not enough information was provided on the Census form to identify the composition of that household.

'Related individuals, non-family' includes all households of individuals who are related but do not form a couple or parent-child relationship. Eg. brother, sister, uncle, nephew, grandparent, cousin etc.

Households where all members were absent on Census night are excluded from the count because their dwellings are unoccupied. Otherwise, absentees from the household have details recorded on the Census form and are included for the purposes of household coding.

For more information about this topic, please see the Household Composition page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Household size

Derived from the three Census questions:

'Name of each person including visitors who spent the night of Tuesday, 5 March 2013 in this dwelling', and 'Where does the person usually live?', and 'Are there any persons who usually live in this dwelling who were absent on Census Night (Tuesday, 5 March 2013)?'

This dataset counts households by the number of persons usually resident, (including residents who were absentees on Census night).

A household is defined as either one person who usually resides alone or two or more people who usually reside together and share facilities (such as eating facilities, cooking facilities, bathroom and toilet facilities, a living area etc).

This dataset excludes visitors to private dwellings who do not normally live there from the count of persons resident. Where all those counted in a dwelling are visitors, the entire household is excluded from this count.

For more information about this topic, please see the Household Composition page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Housing tenure

Derived from the Census questions:

Questions 7-13 on the Census Dwelling Form, tenure of household is used to determine if the household owns the dwelling, holds it in a family trust, or does not own the dwelling, and whether payment is made by the household and to whom.

This data presents the tenure type of occupied private dwellings, and for those dwellings being rented, provides a breakdown of the type of landlord the dwelling is being rented from.

'Owned without a mortgage' includes dwellings which are owned by their occupants, who do not make mortgage repayments. Normally this would indicate that the dwelling is fully owned by the occupants. It could also mean that there is a mortgage but the value of it is fully offset with no payments being made.

'Owned with a mortgage' includes dwellings which are owned by their occupants, who make mortgage repayments.

‘Owned – mortgage status unknown’ includes dwellings where the respondents indicated they owned the home but did not state whether mortgage payments were made.

'Renting – public housing" refers to households renting from a government housing authority such as the Housing New Zealand Corporation, or local council or authority. 'Renting – private sector' refers to households renting from private landlords, real estate agents and employers.

'Renting – from unknown sector' refers to rented dwellings where the landlord type was not stated or unidentifiable.

‘Other tenure type’ primarily includes dwellings held in a family trust.

'Not elsewhere included' includes "Response Unidentifiable", "Outside Scope" and "Not Stated".

Due to the treatment of family trusts in 2001 making this data non-comparable, only 2013 and 2006 data are presented here.

Please note that there is a data quality issue, with public housing believed to be under-estimated by approximately 18 percent by Stats New Zealand in 2013.

For more information please see the Stats NZ pages on Tenure of Household and Sector of Landlord.

Housing rental payments

Derived from the Census questions:

'Does this household pay rent to an owner (or to their agent for this dwelling?' and 'How much rent does this household pay to the owner (or agent) for this dwelling?'

This dataset shows the amount of rent paid by households on a weekly basis for the dwelling in which they were enumerated on Census night.

The answer to the Census question may be given weekly, fortnightly, or monthly but is converted to a weekly amount for output.

These data only apply to households renting their dwelling.

For more information please see the Weekly rent paid by households page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Housing rental payment quartiles

Derived from the Census questions:

'Does this household pay rent to an owner (or to their agent for this dwelling?' and 'How much rent does this household pay to the owner (or agent) for this dwelling?'

Rental payments are not comparable over time because of the influences of economic change such as inflation. The quartile method has been adopted as the most objective method of comparing change in the cost of rental housing of a community over time. It functions in the same way as quartiles for income.

Rent quartiles look at the distribution of rental payments in Wanganui District relative to New Zealand. Quartiles split the total number of renting households into four equal parts for New Zealand. The table shows the number and proportion of households in Wanganui District falling into each segment relative to New Zealand.

The table gives a clear picture of the level of rental payments in Wanganui District relative to New Zealand. For New Zealand, 25% of renting households fall into each category, so by comparison, the table will show if there are more or less households in Wanganui District with high (or low) rent than in Wellington Region. If, for example, Wanganui District has 30% in the top category and only 20% in the lowest, this indicates that Wanganui District has proportionally more households paying 'top-quarter' rents, and less paying 'bottom-quarter' rents.

Users can then compare the levels of rent between Censuses independently of inflation, relative to national benchmarks. This is especially important between 2006 and 2013 as the longer gap between Censuses may lead to more inflation.

Dwelling structure

Derived from two Census questions:

'Mark the space that best describes this dwelling:

  • House or townhouse (NOT joined to any other)
  • House, townhouse, unit or apartment joined to one or more other houses, townhouses, units or apartments
  • Moveable dwelling, for example, caravan, boat, tent etc
  • Other'

And 'Is this building as a whole one storey, two or three storeys, four or more storeys, or none of these?'

Dwelling structure looks at the type of dwelling for all occupied private dwellings. The categories are broadly based on the density and height of the housing types.

'Separate house' includes all free-standing dwellings not physically joined to any other.

'Medium Density' includes 'Two or More Flats/Units/Townhouses/Apartments/Houses joined together in a one storey, two or three storey building', as well as the same category with no storey information. These categories include all dwellings joined to at least one other.

'High density' includes all dwellings joined together in a four or more storey block.

'Other dwelling' includes caravans, mobile homes, improvised dwellings or shelters and people sleeping rough.

Unoccupied dwellings are shown separately in the table, broken down by the reason for unoccupancy. This was a separate question on the form, answered by the Census collector. Further information on this classification is on the Statistics New Zealand website.

Number of bedrooms

Derived from the Census question:

'How many bedrooms are there in this dwelling?'

This dataset counts dwellings by the number of rooms used as bedrooms.

Bedsits and studios, where the living area is also a bedroom, are counted as having one bedroom.

The number of bedrooms counts caravans adjacent to the dwelling if they are used as bedrooms.

For more information please see the Number of Rooms page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Telecommunications access

Derived from the Census question:

'Mark as many spaces as you need to show which of these are available here in this dwelling; a cellphone/mobile phone (that is here all or most of the time), a telephone, fax access, Internet access, none of these.'

Multi-response

This dataset measures whether a household has access to: a cellphone/mobile phone (that is in the dwelling all or most of the time), a telephone, a fax and/or the Internet, to communicate with people outside the dwelling and to use services provided through these media. This requires the device to be in working order and for there to be a working connection.

All households in occupied private dwellings are included, except for visitor only households.

Access to telecommunications is a multiple-response variable, so the total number of responses is normally considerably in excess of the total population. Percentages are calculated from the total population and will add to greater than 100%.

In 2001, no data were collected on access to cellular phones, so these data are only available for 2006 and 2013. As it is a multi-response question, the absence of a category doesn’t affect the percentage calculation, but may affect total responses.

For more information on this topic, please see the Access to Telecommunications page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Car ownership

Derived from the Census question:

'How many motor vehicles (not counting motorbikes) do the people who live here have available for their use?'

'Number of motor vehicles' is the number of motor vehicles that are mechanically operational, but not necessarily licensed or having a current warrant of fitness, and are available for private use by the residents of private dwellings.

Motor vehicles include:

  • cars, station wagons, vans, trucks, four-wheel-drive vehicles and other vehicles used on public roads;
  • business vehicles available for private use by people in the dwelling;
  • vehicles hired or leased, and;
  • vehicles temporarily under repair.

They do not include:

  • motorbikes or scooters;
  • vehicles used only for business;
  • farm vehicles not licensed for road use;
  • vehicles that belong to visitors, and;
  • vehicles occasionally borrowed from another household.

Dwellings containing only visitors are excluded from this and other variables based on occupied private dwellings.

For more information about this topic, please refer to the Number of motor vehicles page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Household fuel type

Derived from the Census question:

'Mark as many spaces as you need to show which of the following are ever used to heat this dwelling; don’t ever use any form of heating in this dwelling, electricity, mains gas (from street), bottled gas, wood, coal, solar heating equipment, other fuel(s).'

Multi-response

Household fuel type indicates the types of fuel used in occupied private dwellings only, for heating purposes only (excludes cooking etc.).

This is a multi-response question, so respondents can mark many boxes. The total of responses will sum to greater than the total population. There is no indication of which is the major fuel type used, or how long or how often any particular fuel type is used. For example, it shows the percentage of households that used electricity and the percentage of households that used wood, but it does not show whether electricity was used more, or less, often than wood.

Mains gas is gas connected to the dwelling by underground pipes and provided on a continuous basis (never runs out). This includes new subdivisions where gas is reticulated from a central gas supply.

Bottled gas is gas provided in a bottle or canister. This may be a large bottle or canister which is located near the house; a contractor or wholesaler may remove and replace with a new one, a smaller bottle that is filled at a retail outlet, or a canister mainly used with camping and/or outdoor equipment.

This dataset is available for 2013, 2006 and 2001.

For more information on this topic, please see the Fuel type used to heat dwelling page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Migration summary

Derived from the Census questions:

'Where does the person usually live?' and 'Where did the person usually live five years ago (on 5 March 2008)'.

Migration information is collected by Statistics New Zealand by a series of questions asking where a person usually lives on Census night and where they lived 5 years prior to Census day.

These tables show the in, out and net migration figures for people (aged 5+) who moved within different geographic areas. The summary table simply shows whether or not people had moved in that time, and whether they had moved within the area, from another part of New Zealand, or from overseas.

The detailed tables show a cross-tabulation of the places where people moved to and from over 5 years, at the Territorial Authority level.

They are ranked in terms of the most highly positive and most highly negative population migration, when taking into account those who moved into Wanganui District from each area and those that moved out of Wanganui District to live in each area. The difference is the net migration. This shows the population flows in overall terms.

‘In migration’ relates to people who in 2013 lived within Wanganui District, but 5 years earlier (in 2008) lived elsewhere (in the area listed in the rows).

‘Out migration’ relates to people who in 2013 lived elsewhere in New Zealand (in the area listed in the rows), but who stated that in 2008 they lived in Wanganui District.

‘Net migration’ equals ‘In migration’ minus ‘Out migration’.

The total of residents who moved into the area includes a small number of people whose response to the 5-year-ago question was unidentifiable, or who had no fixed abode. These are not shown separately on the in-and-out migration tables.

While the data shows people who lived overseas 5 years ago, it is not possible to derive a net figure for this, as those who moved from New Zealand overseas, are not counted in the 2013 Census.

No time series data are shown for this topic, which has an element of time series inherent in the question. Only 2013 Census data is presented.

People under the age of 5 are not included.

For more information on this topic, please see the Usual residence five years ago page on the Stats NZ Census website. page on the Stats NZ Census website.

Migration by age

Derived from the Census questions:

'Where does the person usually live?' and 'Where did the person usually live five years ago (on 5 March 2008)'.

Migration information is collected by the ABS by a series of questions asking where a person usually lived 1 year and 5 years prior to Census day. Only 5-year migration figures are presented here.

The migration by age figures show the number of people who moved in and out of Wanganui District between 2008 and 2013, by their age group.

The age groups used correspond with the ages shown in the ‘Service Age Groups’ page under ‘What is the population?’. They are used because these age groups correlate highly with life stages when people are likely to make housing decisions and move (eg. leaving home, starting a family, retirement).

‘In migration’ relates to people who in 2013 lived within Wanganui District, but 5 years earlier (in 2008) lived elsewhere in New Zealand.

‘Out migration’ relates to people who in 2013 lived elsewhere in New Zealand (in the area listed in the rows), but who stated that in 2006 they lived in Wanganui District.

‘Net migration’ equals ‘In migration’ minus ‘Out migration’.

Please note that overseas migration is NOT included in this table, which relates only to migration within New Zealand. It is possible to have increasing population even if net migration of all age groups is negative, due to births and overseas migration.

For more information please refer to the ABS Data Quality Statement for Place of Usual Residence 5 years Ago on the ABS website.

Residential location of workers

Derived from the Census:

'In that job, did you mostly? Work at home or work away from home. Print the full address of the place you mostly worked at.'

This dataset is known as Journey to Work, and is derived from Census question 39 – "In that job, did you mostly? Work at home or work away from home. Print the full address of the place you mostly worked at." With residential address also known, Journey to Work comprises a matrix linking origin (residence) and work destination.

The data presented here in table form show the Territorial Authority of residence for employed persons who work within the Wanganui District. The map shows the spatial distribution of these workers.

Please note that the workforce in a Territorial Authority calculated from Census data is generally considered to be an undercount, due to the number of people whose workplace address was not stated, could not be accurately coded, or stated a non-permanent workplace address ('no fixed place of work'). These people appear in the employment data at their residential location but cannot be coded to a work destination. This component is around 5-10% of employed workers for most areas, so work destination data will undercount actual employment by about this amount

Employment location of residents

Derived from the Census:

'In that job, did you mostly? Work at home or work away from home. Print the full address of the place you mostly worked at.'

This dataset is known as Journey to Work, and is derived from Census question 39 – "In that job, did you mostly? Work at home or work away from home. Print the full address of the place you mostly worked at." With residential address also known, Journey to Work comprises a matrix linking origin (residence) and work destination.

The data presented here in table form show the Territorial Authority of work destination for employed persons who live within the Wanganui District. The map shows the spatial distribution of where these residents work.

This component is around 5-10% of employed residents for most areas, so work destination data will undercount actual employment by about this amount

For more information please refer to the data quality statement for Place of Work on the Statistics New Zealand website.

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